Ruger lcr rattle fix

Ruger lcr rattle fix

Moderators: flatgate, Moderators. Posted: Fri Jul 23, am. I recently picked up my second LCR. I sold one a few months ago. I understand that the transfer bar design causes a rattle in the LCR. My new LCR rattles much easier than my first one. I did not hear my first one rattle during normal handling or pocket carry.

ruger lcr rattle fix

I understand the manual says there can be a rattle, but I believe mine in abnormal. Does anyone have experience with sending their LCR back to Ruger to have them reduce the rattle? If so, did they pay for it and did it help? Is there a simple fix that I can try? I am assuming no. From what I understand, if Ruger feels the gun is in spec. They won't pay for the shipping back to them. They also may not fix it. It would indeed have to be a factory defect before they would act on it.

However, it never hurts to call them, and see what they say about it. Now, I'm not sure. When I die, I want to go in my sleep like a friend's grandfather did. Not kicking and screaming like the passengers in his car did.

Being this is a mass produced pistol you will find variations. More than likely what is going on is whatever parts that mate up with the transfer bar as well as the transfer bar are on the outer end of spec and there is more play than your other one.

So you just got lucky and got a noisier one. I would not worry about it or spend the money to send it back. I don't see the concern about the rattle. My keys and change make more noise than my or any LCR I have handled. Doubt any thug will know the sound of a transfer bar rattle. A plus, is you can give it to the baby to keep them entertained. I called the factory a week after I got mine I thought I had a loose or broken part and the nice lady told me that this was normal for the LCRno worries.

I just don't hold it upright and shake it any more Posted: Fri Jul 23, pm.Moderators: flatgate, Moderators. Posted: Wed Feb 17, am. I took the grips off, and couldn't see anything loose Is this normal for this gun? Its the transfer bar rattling around. Nothin to worry about. It shouldn't rattle then. ENJOY it!! Posted: Wed Feb 17, pm.

Does your LCR have a rattle? Posted: Sat Feb 20, pm. Only difference is that I did a search here and up popped a few threads regarding this and I was able to go to sleep with no worries. They not only come with a rattle, but a pacifier too. You can bring the rattle to your local gun club, but I recommend leaving the pacie at home; if you're over 30 anyway. NRA Benefactor www. Posted: Sun Feb 21, am. Page 1 of 1. Previous topic Next topic. Post subject: Does your LCR have a rattle?

Post subject: Posted: Wed Feb 17, am. White Willie. Not if I hold my head very still. That was it White Willie wrote: Not if I hold my head very still. I don't have enough marbles left to rattle Post subject: Posted: Wed Feb 17, pm. Why yes.

Yes, it does.Posted: Sat Dec 26, pm. I got a LCR for christmas. It sounds like something is loose in the hammer area. When I shake it, sounds like a rattle. Anybody ever hear this? There is no fix. The transfer bar is rattling around not uncommon with any double action that has a transfer bar.

Of course it is more noticeable on the LCR.

ruger lcr rattle fix

I assume there needs to be a lot of play in the transfer to accommodate something in the newly designed trigger system. As far as not good for concealed carry I would not worry. Your keys or change in your pocket makes more noise than the transfer bar rattle. Posted: Sun Dec 27, am. This must be about the 3rd LCR rattle thread.

Ruger LCR is Broken - Out of Commission, Back to Ruger

I think the a tattle is more noticeable in the LCR because of the polymer frame. Its bad for CCW though because when you are sneaking around hiding in the shadows and waiting for your victim to leave the theater and head to their car, they may hear it rattling around. Which is why I prefer to go "a-mugging" with a K-bar as it has no moving parts and makes less noise.

Posted: Mon Dec 28, pm. Like all newly manufactured Ruger revolvers, your LCR has a transfer bar safety system as part of the fire control mechanism. As a result, a hammer blow can be transmitted to the firing pin only when the trigger is pulled all the way to the rear. This is a positive internal safety feature.

By design, the transfer bar is allowed some movement within the fire control mechanism so that trigger pull is not affected. Due to this necessary "play" in the transfer bar, a shooter will sometimes hear the transfer bar "rattle" when the revolver is shaken. This rattle caused by the play in the transfer bar is completely normal in the LCR. I guess i can shoot it now? Hope they can fix this, anybody know of a way to reduce rattle.

To be sure it is the transfer bar, shake it with the trigger held all the way to the rear after you have dry fired it. That way the transfer bar will be pinched between the hammer and firing pin and should not rattle.

Customer Service

If this stops it, a nice glob of somewhat heavy grease on the transfer bar should stop the rattle, but I hesitate to recommed this due to the fact that the grease will attract dust and grit and could cause issuesPosted: Sat Dec 26, pm.

It sounds like something is loose in the hammer area. When I shake it, sounds like a rattle. Anybody ever hear this? What is the fix? Posted: Sun Dec 27, am. Probably is the transfer bar. It may be normal.

Someone with first hand knowledge will chime. Posted: Mon Dec 28, am. I agree with tek, it's most likely NOT a problem. Posted: Mon Dec 28, pm.

ruger lcr rattle fix

Ruger most likely WILL tell you to send it back in just as a precaution. To satisfy yourself without anyone's opinion confusing you, place a piece of masking tape against the transfer bar, if you can make solid contact with it and shake it again. I bet the rattle stops. How can I reduce the rattle? Like all newly manufactured Ruger revolvers, your LCR has a transfer bar safety system as part of the fire control mechanism.

As a result, a hammer blow can be transmitted to the firing pin only when the trigger is pulled all the way to the rear. This is a positive internal safety feature. By design, the transfer bar is allowed some movement within the fire control mechanism so that trigger pull is not affected.

Due to this necessary "play" in the transfer bar, a shooter will sometimes hear the transfer bar "rattle" when the revolver is shaken. This rattle caused by the play in the transfer bar is completely normal in the LCR. To be sure it is the transfer bar, shake it with the trigger held all the way to the rear after you have dry fired it.

That way the transfer bar will be pinched between the hammer and firing pin and should not rattle. If this stops it, a nice glob of somewhat heavy grease on the transfer bar should stop the rattle, but I hesitate to recommed this due to the fact that the grease will attract dust and grit and could cause issues Posted: Tue Dec 29, am.

You have been given a general concensus that it's the transfer bar you are hearing. It's part of the design of the gun, as evidenced by your posting of info from the manuel. And, if you try to "fix" the rattle, you may make it unreliable to shoot.We also are working to ensure the prompt, quality customer service you have come to expect from Ruger.

We are taking a number of steps to protect our employees, including reducing the number of employees in any one space at a given time. As a result, we have reduced the number of Customer Service employees both taking calls and repairing firearms at any given time.

As a result, our phone wait times and repair turnaround times may be longer than usual. We ask for your patience and understanding as we do our best to balance the health and safety of our employees and communities with our desire to provide superior customer service. Under the circumstances, we recommend that customers carefully consider whether service is required at this time. If not, please consider delaying return of your firearm for service until the situation normalizes.

Of course, if you are concerned with the safety or reliability of your firearm, please do not use it and contact our Customer Service Department to make arrangements for service. We recommend using our Online Support Request Form below, as we are able to more quickly respond to these submissions during these expected longer phone wait times. We remain committed to offering the best customer service in the industry, and will do our very best to repair and return your firearm as quickly as possible.

Simply select a category and then click the "Answer" button next to the question for information on that topic. If you cannot find the answer to your question below, please see here for contact information.

Pistols that appeared on the California Roster of Handguns Certified for Sale "Roster" were tested and approved pursuant to the regulations in effect at that time. If we change the weight, dimensions, or materials of a part, then that is a change that CADOJ says requires re-testing.

As part of Ruger's program of continuous improvement, we routinely make changes and enhancements to our products. Any firearm that is re-tested must now incorporate microstamping technology described in another FAQ.

As this is not feasible, we cannot resubmit any pistols after we have made a change, and the pistol is dropped from the Roster by operation of law. We at Ruger are committed to our customers in California. The problem is the microstamping requirement described in another FAQ in California. What is microstamping? Microstamping is a patented process that micro-laser engraves the firearm's make, model and serial number on the tip of the gun's firing pin so that, in theory, it imprints the information on discharged cartridge cases.

California's law requires that any pistol added to the roster includes microstamping technology that imprints this information in two locations on discharged cartridge cases. The technology does not work.

An independent, peer-reviewed study published in the professional scholarly journal for forensic firearms examiners proved that the concept of microstamping is unreliable and does not function as the patent holder claims. It can be easily defeated in mere seconds using common household tools. Criminals could also simply switch the engraved firing pin to a readily available unmarked spare part, thereby circumventing the process.

To date, no firearms have been made by any manufacturer that utilizes this unproven technology. Yes - Ruger can and will continue to repair and return any handgun which is legal to possess in California i. If your handgun requires replacement, Ruger cannot send a replacement firearm which is not legal for sale in California, including those handguns not listed on the California Roster of Handguns Certified for Sale "Roster".

Firearms can only be replaced with a firearm that is legal for sale in California in its factory configuration. Therefore, replacement handguns must be presently listed on the Roster. Yes, provided you are not looking to purchase a magazine with a capacity in excess of 10 rounds or parts which must be factory fitted.Moderators: flatgate, Moderators.

Posted: Wed Feb 22, pm. I replaced it with an LCR. Now all double action revolvers I own are Ruger. SP and LCR have decidedly different systems of locking crane to frame. SP's system appears to be significantly more robust, permitting less leverage to distort or "bend" the crane from proper alignment.

Why did Ruger design the LCR with a less durable crane lock-up than any other currently manufactured Ruger double action revolver? I detect no reason for the design change. William Burroughs. I have an LCR. Most folks shoot. It fits it's niche as a good SD small revolver very well. Posted: Thu Feb 23, am.

I would like you to specifically show how the frame lockup is different than the SP, and how it would allow more eventual "distortion" in the future.

If that is actually possible to predict, how does it conflict with what Mus wrote? I'll do my best to respond to your replies. I have no access to creating or loading graphics to web pages. I do not understand this phrase - unless you mean is one revolver more expensive than the other. My replacement cost was almost exactly the replacement cost of a Since my LCR was [barely] used, and any must be used, that comparison is accurate.

ruger lcr rattle fix

FYI: s are perceived to be more valuable than many later versions. No lock. No MIM parts. The MIM doesn't mean much to me. No lock does. SP's crane lock-up is similar to the first two Triple Lock lock points - not identical, though. LCR deletes the second lock while maintaining numbers one and three - again, not identical, though.

Distance between LCR's front and rear points of lock-up, being longer than were number two included and number three deleted, has more room for flex and tolerance. I cannot report this with certainty, though.

So you may be accurate regarding perceived substance. Page 1 of 1. Previous topic Next topic. Post subject: Ruger LCR's crane lock-up? You cannot post new topics in this forum You cannot reply to topics in this forum You cannot edit your posts in this forum You cannot delete your posts in this forum.Simply select a category and then click the "Answer" button next to the question for information on that topic. If you cannot find the answer to your question below, please click here for contact information.

Pistols that appeared on the California Roster of Handguns Certified for Sale "Roster" were tested and approved pursuant to the regulations in effect at that time. If we change the weight, dimensions, or materials of a part, then that is a change that CADOJ says requires re-testing. As part of Ruger's program of continuous improvement, we routinely make changes and enhancements to our products. Any firearm that is re-tested must now incorporate microstamping technology described in another FAQ.

As this is not feasible, we cannot resubmit any pistols after we have made a change, and the pistol is dropped from the Roster by operation of law. We at Ruger are committed to our customers in California. The problem is the microstamping requirement described in another FAQ in California. What is microstamping? Microstamping is a patented process that micro-laser engraves the firearm's make, model and serial number on the tip of the gun's firing pin so that, in theory, it imprints the information on discharged cartridge cases.

California's law requires that any pistol added to the roster includes microstamping technology that imprints this information in two locations on discharged cartridge cases. The technology does not work. An independent, peer-reviewed study published in the professional scholarly journal for forensic firearms examiners proved that the concept of microstamping is unreliable and does not function as the patent holder claims.

It can be easily defeated in mere seconds using common household tools. Criminals could also simply switch the engraved firing pin to a readily available unmarked spare part, thereby circumventing the process. To date, no firearms have been made by any manufacturer that utilizes this unproven technology.

Yes - Ruger can and will continue to repair and return any handgun which is legal to possess in California i. If your handgun requires replacement, Ruger cannot send a replacement firearm which is not legal for sale in California, including those handguns not listed on the California Roster of Handguns Certified for Sale "Roster".

Firearms can only be replaced with a firearm that is legal for sale in California in its factory configuration. Therefore, replacement handguns must be presently listed on the Roster.

Yes, provided you are not looking to purchase a magazine with a capacity in excess of 10 rounds or parts which must be factory fitted. We cannot ship so-called "high-capacity" magazines to California.

Parts which require factory fitting must be installed at the factory, which would require that you contact our Customer Service department at for a RMA. Double-action revolvers also are available in California and we regularly submit our double-action revolvers for testing and inclusion on the Roster.

Over three dozen of our double-action revolvers are available in California. California law prohibits all ammunition magazines with a capacity greater than 10 rounds. Auto-loading centerfire rifles are restricted due to California's feature-based, so-called "Assault Weapon" ban. Ruger makes all of its centerfire rifles that are not prohibited by California's "Assault Weapon" ban available for sale in California.

Connect With Ruger

I'm so glad to see you now have a Custom Shop. What sort of custom work do you offer? Can you build me a custom gun? We are not performing individual custom work at this time. We are in the early stages of developing this new program, and are very pleased with the response we have seen. We are working hard to bring additional products to the Custom Shop line, but do not have any plans to offer custom work in the near term.

How can I get an instruction manual for my gun? Ruger instruction manuals for both currently produced and out-of-production models can be downloaded directly from this website by clicking here.


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